The secret to the perfection of Shawshank Redemption

I've been seriously reading classic English and American literature for almost five years now and I've raved a lot about 19th century novels which I thought matter until today, if not to the regular book reader, at least, to a student of writing like myself. But a recent rewatching of the book-to-film adaptation of Stephen King's Shawshank Redemption (originally published as Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption) has opened my eyes to what kind of stories that touch my heart and soul regardless of whether it was published in 1817 or 2017. I've seen this movie about two or three times a few years ago before Netflix. The producers have not added a previously deleted scene or remastered it for the millenial audience. Nothing in it has changed. Only I have changed and I celebrate this new chapter in my wisdom-seeking life by sharing with you what kind of stories we should tell ourselves.

Bill Gates Recommended Book: The Rosie Project

Project Rosie is about the aspie (person with Asperger's Syndrome) geneticist Don Tillman, who works as an associate professor at a prestigious university in Melbourne, Australia. He is 40 years old, earns more than people his age, and is in need of a suitable life partner. But because of his want of social skills, which almost always tend to embarrass him or the people he interacts with, he has very few friends and even fewer chances of dating someone he likes.

10 New Things I learned about Steve Jobs in this Biography

Steve Jobs was a very complex person, charming and seductive when he wanted to be, manipulative and scathing when he didn't get his wishes. Tim Cook, the current CEO, described him as passionate, which is true. But Isaacson also shed light on the costs of his obsessions and creativity, which is not always equivalent to a loss of millions of dollars, but sometimes, good relationships with co-workers and friends and wives, daughters, and children.

Cold Mountain

Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain is a story about a soldier, Inman, who after recovering from his war wound, goes on a perilous journey home to be reunited with his love, Ada Monroe. It's a beautifully written novel, full of description of America that may no longer exist today. Frazier painted a landscape that breathes life simply because the hero, Inman, chose to interact with any animal or person he met on his journey, never mind if sometimes, he regretted getting involved.